NIEHS News

  1. Low-Level Arsenic Exposure Before Birth Associated with Early Puberty and Obesity in Female Mice

    Mice exposed to low-level arsenic in utero become obese adults. The control mouse, left, was not exposed to arsenic during embryonic development and is a normal weight. In comparison, mice exposed to arsenic at 10 parts per billion, center, and 42 parts per million, right, are visibly heavier. The study also determined that these exposed mice entered puberty earlier than controls. (Photo courtesy...
  2. Newly Discovered Cells Restore Liver Damage in Mice without Cancer Risk

    The liver is unique among organs in its ability to regenerate after being damaged. Exactly how it repairs itself remained a mystery until recently, when researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health discovered a type of cell in mice essential to the process. The researchers also found similar cells in humans. When healthy liver cells are depleted by long-term exposure to toxic chemic...
  3. New UC Davis Environmental Research Center Links Science With Advocacy

  4. NIEHS Scientists Identify the Immunity Proteins That Cause a Majority of DNA Damage in Several Types of Human Cancers

    $(document).ready(function() { $('.content > h1').text('Media Availability — August 10 – 24, 2015'); }); New research published online August 10 in the journal Nature Genetics found that a mutation-causing enzyme known as APOBEC3A (A3A) may be the main cause of mutations in certain cancers. Previous work from other groups implicated another APOBEC enzyme, known as APOBEC3B (A3B). Correspondi...
  5. Life is but a DREAM

  6. Researchers Identify Protein in Mice That Helps Prepare for Healthy Egg-Sperm Union

    Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a protein that plays a vital role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice. The protein RGS2 can delay an egg’s development into an embryo in order to allow time for sperm to arrive and merge with the egg in a healthy fertilization process. The embryo cannot survive without the male chromosomes. ...
  7. Could Hormone-Related Cancers Start Before Birth?

  8. UA College of Pharmacy Researchers Link Liver Disease and Drug Metabolism

    Researchers at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy have discovered that nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), an increasingly common but often undiagnosed liver disease, could have significant medical implications for people with type 2 diabetes.
  9. NTP Findings Consistent with Actions Taken During Chemical Spill

  10. NIH Study Solves Ovarian Cell Mystery, Shedding New Light on Reproductive Disorders

    The ovarian follicle stained above shows the egg (red center), surrounded by the supporting granulosa cells (green) and outer theca cells (red and orange). Yao and his team found that all three must communicate to maintain a healthy follicle. (Photo courtesy of Chang Liu) Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have solved a lo...
  11. NIH Statement on World Asthma Day 2015

    On World Asthma Day 2015, the National Institutes of Health stands with the international community to renew our commitment to advance our understanding of asthma and develop effective strategies to manage and prevent the disease. Within a broad asthma research portfolio, NIH-supported scientists are making progress in understanding how certain exposures—such as to microbes, allergy-triggering sub...
  12. HHS Issues Final Recommendation For Community Water Fluoridation

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services today released the final Public Health Service (PHS) recommendation for the optimal fluoride level in drinking water to prevent tooth decay.
  13. NIEHS Grantee Frederica Perera Receives Prestigious Heinz Award for the Environment

    Frederica Perera, Ph.D., Dr. P.H., founder and director of the Columbia (University) Center for Children's Environmental Health is being recognized for pioneering the field of molecular epidemiology and for her decades-long research to illuminate the health consequences children suffer from prenatal and childhood exposures to hazardous chemicals, for the benefit of parents, health professionals an...
  14. NIH Still Active in Gulf Region Five Years After Oil Spill

    Three-part research approach focuses on communities and health Five years after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion, researchers at the National Institutes of Health are actively working with Gulf region community partners, to learn if any human health problems resulted from the disaster and establish a new research response plan to be better prepared for future disasters. The National Insti...
  15. L.A. Story: Cleaner Air, Healthier Kids