preventionisthecure.org

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Top News Stories


Occupational Exposure to Organic Solvents May Increase Risk for Breast Cancer in Women

E-mail Print PDF

A newly released NIEHS study helps to break down the relationship between work-related chemical exposures and increased risk of breast cancer in women. Read more to see how some cleaning products may increase your risk: http://www.insideprevention.org/2014/08/qa-niehs-scientists-explain-findings-of-breast-cancer-study.html

 

 

Cancer cases to soar 57% in 20 years

E-mail Print PDF
Prevention IS the cure.
WHO: Cancer cases to soar 57% in 20 years.

By Tim Hume and Jen Christensen, CNN

Cancer cases are expected to surge 57% worldwide in the next 20 years, an imminent "human disaster" that will require a renewed focus on prevention to combat, according to the World Health Organization.

The World Cancer Report, produced by the WHO's specialized cancer agency and released on World Cancer Day, predicts new cancer cases will rise from an estimated 14 million annually in 2012 to 22 million within two decades. Over the same period, cancer deaths are predicted to rise from 8.2 million a year to 13 million.

Click here to read the full article.

 

The Cancer Divide: Tackling a Racial Gap in Breast Cancer Survival

E-mail Print PDF

The Cancer Divide: Tackling a Racial Gap in Breast Cancer Survival

Coming together to reduce the gap. Recent New York Times article explores “The Breast Cancer Gap,” as mortality rates between women continue to widen.

The cancer divide between black women and white women in the United States is as entrenched as it is startling. In the 1980s, breast cancer survival rates for the two were nearly identical. But since 1991, as improvements in screening and treatment came into use, the gap has widened, with no signs of abating. Although breast cancer is diagnosed in far more white women, black women are far more likely to die of the disease.

The gap in cancer survival cannot be explained away by biological differences in cancer between blacks and whites, researchers say. While African-American women are at greater risk of a more aggressive form of cancer known as triple negative, those cancers account for only about 10 percent of diagnoses.

Click here to read the entire article, by New York Times' Tara Parker-Pope

 

 

 

Woman of the Year: Karen Miller

E-mail Print PDF

kjmheadshot

We are excited to finally let our secret out! The Times Beacon Record Newspaper awarded HBCAC President, Karen Miller as Woman of The Year!

 

HBCAC is thrilled for her accomplishments as Karen proves that one person can inspire others to work together can be a force for change.

Whether you are snowed in or starting your weekend early, take a moment to read the entire article here.

 

 
  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  4 
  •  5 
  •  6 
  •  7 
  •  8 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »


Page 1 of 8